A-H

A – H          I – P          Q – Z

A Just Harvest

7649 N. Paulina Street 
Chicago, IL 60626, www.ajustharvest.org

KUC Liaisons: Michael Petersen and Brad Wigdale

A Just Harvest serves nutritious, hot meals to the needy in the North of Howard neighborhood of Chicago’s Rogers Park. The kitchen began serving a few meals a week in 1983 and through its unique partnership with forty community organizations, it now provides meals 365 days a year. The kitchen serves around 150 people every evening. In addition, the kitchen has established a community organizing effort, Northside POWER to advocate for safer streets, increased access to healthcare, job training and living wage jobs for kitchen patrons and community residents. Kenilworth Union Church is one of the Kitchen’s partner congregations. On the second Monday of each month, eight to ten volunteers from the congregation purchase food off of a pre-assigned shopping list and meet at the Kitchen to provide food service. It’s a great opportunity for family and friends to experience the full impact of Kenilworth Union’s outreach ministry.

web testimonial


 

Association House of Chicago

1116 North Kedzie Avenue, Chicago, IL 60651,  www.associationhouse.org

KUC Liaisons: Ron Kurz and Jon Van Gorp

Annually, Association House of Chicago impacts nearly 20,000 children, adults, and families through a continuum of bilingual, evidence-based programs through five broad program service areas. They offer community members in Humbolt Park the tools they need as they address both immediate needs and work toward long-term self-sufficiency goals through five direct-service program areas.


Breakthrough Urban Ministries -NEW

402 North St. Louis Avenue, Chicago, IL 60624,  www.breakthrough.org

KUC Liaisons: Diane Rand and Paul Rand

Breakthrough Urban Ministries is located in and serves residents of East Garfield Park, one of Chicago’s most under-served, high poverty neighborhoods on the west side of Chicago. Each year, Breakthrough Urban Ministries serves 4,800 youth, families, and homeless adults through an integration of core service areas focusing on housing stability and wraparound services– employment and job creation, health and wellness, and education. Last year, over 900 individuals were served by the Daytime Support Center. The Transitional Housing program served over 250 homeless adults. The Fresh Market food pantry served over 2,800 individuals and the agency’s youth program served over 800 youth.

 


The Cara Program

703 West Monroe, Chicago, IL 60661, 
 www.thecaraprogram.org

KUC Liaisons: Liz Dickey and Susan Resko

The mission of The Cara Program is to assist the homeless and at-risk populations in their efforts to achieve real and lasting success by providing comprehensive training, permanent job placement and critical support services. Founded in 1991 by Tom Owens, The Cara Program works in coordination with other agencies, several of which are part of the KUC Outreach Program, to source, screen, train and find jobs for the most disadvantaged segment of our population. Developing skills to positively approach work and life is the foundation of The Cara Program.

The Transformation Seminar anchors the program and includes critical life skills classes, followed by job training and specialized skills training. The core of the Transformations Seminar is focused on topics such as self-esteem building, ethics, conflict management, diversity training and daily motivations. The results speak for themselves: over 2,300 individuals affected by homelessness and poverty placed into quality, permanent jobs. Currently 73 percent of students remain employed for more than one year. The current average hourly wage for employed students is $11.00, more than $4.00 above the federal minimum wage. Over 100+ Chicago area companies hire Cara students.


Career Transitions Center

703 W. Monroe Street, Chicago, IL 60661, www.ctcchicago.org

KUC Liaisons: Meredith Daw and Jan Wishart

Kenilworth Union members may participate in career and life planning programs offered by the Career Transitions Center of Chicago at a reduced rate. Programs are offered for a variety of individuals at different life stages. CTC provides professional support to those seeking a job, looking for meaningful work, or otherwise undergoing a career transition. CTC was founded by five faith communities and delivers employment programming and coaching to assist both recent college graduates and older under- and unemployed workers.

Casa Central

1343 N. California Ave.
Chicago, IL 60622,
 www.casacentral.org

KUC Liaisons:  Mignon DuPepe and Diane Krueger

Casa Central was founded in 1954 by a multi-denominational group of churches, to assist a growing population of Hispanics adjusting to life in Chicago’s inner city. The agency has grown to become the largest Hispanic social service agency in the Midwest. Its 23 programs are organized into four categories of services to reach populations in need: 1) Early Learning and Out-of-School-Time programs, 2) Child Welfare Services, 3) Family Services, and 4) Senior Programs. Casa Central’s facilities are located in the Humboldt Park Neighborhood. KUC has focused its outreach funds primarily towards the LaPosado program which provides homeless families temporary housing (usually up to 9 months), childcare and job training programs, computer accessibility and training, with the goal of enabling families to transition into their own homes and jobs again. Casa Central always welcomes volunteer help and donations of household supplies, school and computer supplies, toys, books and games for children. KUC groups have volunteered at Casa Central in the past.


Chicago Child Care Society

5467 South University Ave.
 Chicago, IL 60615,  
www.cccsociety.org

KUC Liaisons: Reed Eberle and Bob Lindstrom

Chicago Child Care Society is a multi-service, non-profit child welfare agency that delivers high impact intervention and prevention services for children and youth who are facing significant challenges in their lives. Founded in 1849, as the Chicago Orphan Asylum, CCCS is Illinois’ oldest child welfare agency. Our mission is to provide innovative, community-based education and social service programs that address the current and emerging needs of vulnerable children and their families.

Our programs address early childhood (2-5 years), teen parents, at-risk adolescents/teens, foster care and tackle societal issues of poverty, substance abuse, teen pregnancy and inadequate child care and healthcare. CCCS provides comprehensive support for children and links families to services that address individual needs and contribute to independence and long-term success. CCCS remains a well-known organization in the Hyde Park and Kenwood communities.


 

Christopher House

2507 N. Greenview Ave.
 Chicago, IL 60614, 
www.christopherhouse.org

KUC Liaisons: Holly Smirl and Jessica LeFebvre

For more than 100 years, Christopher House has made a real difference in the lives of thousands of low-income families on Chicago’s north and west sides. Each year, Christopher House’s five locations serve more than 4,000 children and their family members, providing a wide variety of quality services, including nationally accredited early childhood education, after school and summer youth programs, teen parent and infant development programs, adult education, counseling, parent education, emergency assistance, food pantry and more.

Low-income families come to Christopher House to receive education and other support services that help them overcome obstacles of poverty to succeed. The programs have a successful track record. A few examples of accomplishments include: 84% of five-year-olds leave the early childhood program ready for kindergarten; 86% of teens in the college and career prep services take the right steps to ensure college success; and 100% of teen mothers in the parenting program are enrolled with a medical provider. With help from Kenilworth Union Church, Christopher House provides holiday gifts and meals to over 1500 families each December.


CommunityHealth

2611 W. Chicago Ave.
 Chicago, IL 60622, www.communityhealth.org

KUC Liaisons: Tim Dugan and Ryan Cahill

Founded in 1993, Community Health is dedicated to serving the uninsured and underserved in Chicago and surrounding communities. In 2010, Community Health provided more than 25,000 medical, dental, and educational visits for more than 8,000 patients. With our comprehensive patient services and many institutional affiliations, Community Health is a leader among free clinics nationwide.

On September 27th, 2010, Community Health established a satellite site in Chicago’s south side Englewood neighborhood – a community with great need and limited resources. This new resource will allow Community Health to broaden its reach to meet the growing numbers and needs of Chicago’s most vulnerable residents and communities. It will be modeled after Community Health’s West Town facility in both volunteer structure and services offered. The newly renovated first floor health center houses eight exam rooms, a lab, dispensary, and a classroom for health education. The lower level, to be renovated in early 2011, includes four dental treatment stations and a lab.


Connections for Abused Women and Their Children (CAWC)

P.O. Box 477916
 Chicago, IL 60647,
 www.cawc.org

KUC Liaisons: Ronald Sipiora and Jane Dearborn

CAWC provides that important safe refuge and support to help women and their children take those first brave steps to ending abuse. CAWC has a number of shelters in the Chicago area open 24 hours a day, 365 days a year. The shelters provide core domestic violence services including: 24 hour crisis phone line, individual and group counseling services, safety planning, court advocacy, life skill development and referrals. The shelters provide multilingual services to non-English speakers.
Domestic violence is especially damaging to children who have witnessed the abuse. Not only is their own personal safety threatened, but this exposure affects their ability to learn, to establish relationships with others, and to cope with stress. CAWC provides support to child victims of domestic violence through comprehensive Children’s Services at its Greenhouse Shelter and Humboldt Park Outreach program sites. The goal of all Children’s Services is to reduce the negative impact of domestic violence by addressing safety issues as well as emotional, psychological, and behavioral consequences.


The Cradle

2049 Ridge Avenue, Evanston, Illinois 60201, www.cradle.org

KUC Liaisons: Kitty Bliss and Rachael Riggs-Nocera

Renowned as one of the foremost adoption agencies in the country, since opening in 1923 The Cradle has helped place more than 15,000 children into permanent, loving homes. They provide lifelong support for all who are touched by adoption — birthparents, adopted persons, and adoptive parents.


Crushers Club -NEW

1406 W. 64th Street, Chicago, IL 60636,  www.crushersclub.org

KUC Liaisons: Silvi Pirn and Jeff Schneiders

Crusher’s Club’s mission is to be the strongest alternative to gangs. They arm young people with the support and skills they need to restore their lives and improve their neighborhood. Crushers Club is rooted in four ideals—respect, discipline, ownership, and love—that gives its members a fighting chance.

From Circuit Court of Cook County, Juvenile Justice and Child Protection Division: “In the Englewood neighborhood, Crushers Club is a beacon of hope. Offering top tier boxing instruction, mentoring, and music studio workshop, it is a place where kids who have nowhere else to go can spend their time constructively, creatively and safely.   Crushers Club is the number one program offered on the streets of Englewood. There is no doubt in my mind this program saves lives daily and under the leadership of Sally Hazelgrove, will continue to do so.”  —Dominique Scalzetti, Juvenile Probation Officer


Deborah’s Place

2822 W. Jackson Blvd. 
Chicago, IL 60612, www.deborahsplace.org

KUC Liaisons: Liz Dischner and Jiffy Willson

For the past 25 years, Deborah’s Place has worked to break the cycle of homelessness through compassionate, innovative, and award-winning programs. Our dedicated volunteers and staff support women through their journeys from homelessness to permanent supportive housing with comprehensive services.

Women are especially vulnerable to the factors that contribute to homelessness – factors like chronic poverty, a rapidly changing housing market, illness, and addiction. This year in Chicago more than 12,000 women will experience the devastating effects of homelessness.

Family Matters

7731 N. Marshfield Avenue, Chicago, IL 60626, www.familymatterschicago.org

KUC Liaisons: Laurie Petersen and Sharon Smarsh

Family Matters supports Chicago youth and their families through programs and initiatives that advance growth, leadership and achievement with support from volunteers and partner organizations.


Family Promise, Chicago North Shore

PO Box 484 Glencoe, IL 60022, www.fpcnorthshore.org

KUC Liaisons: Richard Day and Jessica LeFebvre

Families with young children in homeless situations in Chicago and its northern and northwestern suburbs are served by this agency. Family Promise helps them return to permanent housing by offering support and assistance.


 

Haven Youth and Family Services

825 Green Bay Rd Suite 200 Wilmette IL 60091, www.havenforyouth.org

KUC Liaisons: Maureen Kebo and Carol Gerner

Haven offers programs in prevention, intervention and private counseling in collaboration with schools and community agencies for youth and their families facing crisis. Haven has been in operation since 1976 and has grown programming to include workshops, youth groups, service-learning and more.


Hillside Food Pantry

2727 Crawford Avenue, Evanston, IL 60201, www.hillsidefree.com

KUC Liaisons: Richard and Holly Smirl

Hillside Food Pantry began as an outreach ministry committed to showing the love of God in a meaningful way by distributing “rescued food” to people in need. It also provides an opportunity for people from all walks of life to come together for a common purpose and help make our community a better place for all of us.


Holy Family Ministries

3415 W. Arlington Street, Chicago, IL 60624 www.hfm.org

KUC Liaisons: Liz Chandler and  John Palmer

Holy Family’s mission is to nurture the healthy social, academic, physical, and spiritual development of Chicago children and youth.   Equipped with intellectual curiosity, competitive academic skills, confidence, health and faith, the children in Holy Family’s care will thrive socially and academically.  Holy Family School alumni will access top-performing high schools and the colleges of their choice.  As adults, they will make positive contributions in their communities, churches, and families.

The school and youth development programs operated by Holy Family Ministries are open to all who enroll, and offered “first-come, first-served,” without regard to religion, race, previous academic achievement, or ethnicity.

Holy Trinity High School

1443 W Division St, Chicago, IL 60642   www.holytrinity-hs.org

KUC Liasions:  Sarah Hepner and John Raitt

Holy Trinity High School is a Catholic, co-educational high school sponsored by the Brothers of Holy Cross and located on the near-north side of Chicago. Holy Trinity serves predominantly low-income, at-risk teenagers from some of the city’s most challenging communities.
The school’s experience faculty and staff provide individualized attention, a challenging academic curriculum, and strong moral guidance, creating a learning environment that transforms the hearts and minds of students, allowing them to realize their goals and ambitions. Holy Trinity students develop a strong foundation based on self-respect, discipline, and social awareness. Since 2006, 100 percent of Holy Trinity graduates have achieved college acceptance.

Holy Trinity operates without public funding or funding from the Archdiocese of Chicago. Tuition payments amount to about 28 percent of the school’s operating budget. Outside scholarship agencies contribute another 18 percent, with Holy Trinity raising the remaining 54 percent from individuals, corporations, and other organizations. KUC’s support provides scholarships to three Holy Trinity Honor Roll students-who qualify for the scholarship by scoring above the 85th percentile on the school’s entrance exam, maintaining a 3.5 cumulative grade-point average, and participating in service to the school and community.